E-KİTAP PROJESİ®

~ TÜRKİYE'NİN e-KİTAP PROJESİ ~

Her zaman, Cennet'in Kitaplardan oluşmuş dev bir Kütüphane olduğunu hayal ettim. —Jorge Luis Borges

POPÜLER KİTAPLAR
Generic selectors
Başlıkla Eşleşenler
Başlıklarda Ara
İçeriklerde Ara
Postalarda Ara
Sayfalarda Ara
Filter by Categories
Bilimsel Makaleler – Murat Ukray
Bir Kitap, 10 Ağaç!
E-KİTAP HAKKINDA
e-KİTAP OKUMA KILAVUZU
e-Kitap Projesi (Yeni Gelişmeler & İleri Teknolojiler - Editoryal)
e-KİTAP SATIN ALMA KILAVUZU
e-Kitap Teknolojileri & Haberleri
e-Kitap Yayınlamak?
En İyi e-Kitap Siteleri
GÜNCEL & GLOBAL HABERLER
HOBİ KÖŞESİ
İndirilecek Belgeler
Kitabımı Yayınlatmaya Başlamadan Önce Neler Yapmalıyım?
Kitabımı Yayınlattıktan Sonra Sahip Olacağım Haklar Nelerdir?
Kitabımın Ebatlarını, İç sayfa ve Kapak tasarımını Nasıl Belirlemeliyim?
Kitabımın Fiyatını Nasıl Belirlemeliyim?
Kitabımın Yayın Sürecinde Karşılaşabileceğim Yasal Prosedürler Nelerdir?
KİTAP & YAYIN DÜNYASINDAN HABERLER
Kitap Ebat ve Fiyatları
Kısaca e-Yayıncılığın Tarihçesi
Online Kitap (Avantajları & Yenilikleri)
Piyano & Gitar Müzik yapma Sayfası
ŞİMDİ YAYINLAMAK İSTİYORUM
YAYINLANMIŞ MAKALELER
Yazarın Telif Hakları
YAZARLARIMIZ

Diğer Arama Sonuçları...

An Essay on the Principle of Population

An Essay on the Principle of Population
11.99 $ (Basılı)eBook: 9.99 ₺ (eKitap)
Author:
Genres: Business & Economics, İNGİLİZCE KİTAPLAR, Non-Fiction
Publisher: e-Kitap Projesi
Publication Year: 2013
Format: (eKitap + Basılı)
Length: İngilizce, 15 x 23 cm, 166 sayfa
ASIN: 150010972X
ISBN: 9781304245700
Rating:

The following Essay owes its origin to a conversation with a friend, on the subject of Mr Godwin's essay on avarice and profusion, in his Enquirer. The discussion started the general question of the future improvement of society, and the Author at first sat down with an intention of merely stating his thoughts to his friend, upon paper, in a clearer manner than he thought he could do in conversation. But as the subject opened upon him, some ideas occurred, which he did not recollect to have met with before; and as he conceived that every least light, on a topic so generally interesting, might be received with candour, he determined to put his thoughts in a form for publication.

E-Kitabımı Nasıl Okuyacağım?

E-Kitabımı Nasıl Satın Alacağım?

About the Book
Online-Özeti-Oku

Basılı-olarak-satın-al

D-&-R-Logo İdefix-Logo

The following Essay owes its origin to a conversation with a friend, on the subject of Mr Godwin's essay on avarice and profusion, in his Enquirer. The discussion started the general question of the future improvement of society, and the Author at first sat down with an intention of merely stating his thoughts to his friend, upon paper, in a clearer manner than he thought he could do in conversation. But as the subject opened upon him, some ideas occurred, which he did not recollect to have met with before; and as he conceived that every least light, on a topic so generally interesting, might be received with candour, he determined to put his thoughts in a form for publication.

The Essay might, undoubtedly, have been rendered much more complete by a collection of a greater number of facts in elucidation of the general argument. But a long and almost total interruption from very particular business, joined to a desire (perhaps imprudent) of not delaying the publication much beyond the time that he originally proposed, prevented the Author from giving to the subject an undivided attention. He presumes, however, that the facts which he has adduced will be found to form no inconsiderable evidence for the truth of his opinion respecting the future improvement of mankind. As the Author contemplates this opinion at present, little more appears to him to be necessary than a plain statement, in addition to the most cursory view of society, to establish it.

It is an obvious truth, which has been taken notice of by many writers, that population must always be kept down to the level of the means of subsistence; but no writer that the Author recollects has inquired particularly into the means by which this level is effected: and it is a view of these means which forms, to his mind, the strongest obstacle in the way to any very great future improvement of society. He hopes it will appear that, in the discussion of this interesting subject, he is actuated solely by a love of truth, and not by any prejudices against any particular set of men, or of opinions. He professes to have read some of the speculations on the future improvement of society in a temper very different from a wish to find them visionary, but he has not acquired that command over his understanding which would enable him to believe what he wishes, without evidence, or to refuse his assent to what might be unpleasing, when accompanied with evidence.

The view which he has given of human life has a melancholy hue, but he feels conscious that he has drawn these dark tints from a conviction that they are really in the picture, and not from a jaundiced eye or an inherent spleen of disposition. The theory of mind which he has sketched in the two last chapters accounts to his own understanding in a satisfactory manner for the existence of most of the evils of life, but whether it will have the same effect upon others must be left to the judgement of his readers.

If he should succeed in drawing the attention of more able men to what he conceives to be the principal difficulty in the way to the improvement of society and should, in consequence, see this difficulty removed, even in theory, he will gladly retract his present opinions and rejoice in a conviction of his error.

7 June 1798

About the Author
Thomas Malthus

He (Thomas) Robert Malthus
(13 February 1766 – 23 December 1834) was a British cleric and scholar, influential in the fields of political economy and demography. Malthus himself used only his middle name Robert. Malthus became widely known for his theories about change in population. His An Essay on the Principle of Population observed that sooner or later population will be checked by famine and disease. He wrote in opposition to the popular view in 18th-century Europe that saw society as improving and in principle as perfectible. He thought that the dangers of population growth precluded progress towards a utopian society: "The power of population is indefinitely greater than the power in the earth to produce subsistence for man". As a cleric, Malthus saw this situation as divinely imposed to teach virtuous behaviour. Malthus wrote:
That the increase of population is necessarily limited by the means of subsistence, That population does invariably increase when the means of subsistence increase, and, That the superior power of population is repressed, and the actual population kept equal to the means of subsistence, by misery and vice.
Malthus placed the longer-term stability of the economy above short-term expediency. He criticised the Poor Laws, and (alone among important contemporary economists) supported the Corn Laws, which introduced a system of taxes on British imports of wheat. His views became influential, and controversial, across economic, political, social and scientific thought. Pioneers of evolutionary biology read him, notably Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace. He remains a much-debated writer.

"E-Kitap Projesinde yayınlanan tüm eserlerin telif hakkı saklıdır. Hiçbir şekilde kopya edilemez veya yasa dışı yollarla çoğaltılamaz. Yayınlanan Tüm Elektronik & Basılı kitap, materyal ve eserlerin, indirmeler, ve ticari satış hakları ekitap projesine aittir." e-Kitap Yayıncılık & Cheapest Books: " *E-Kitap Yayıncılık ve *Chapest Books, E-Kitap Projesi'nin yan kuruluşudur.."